Governor Hochul’s Controversial Plan To Combat Subway Crime Is A BIT Surprising!

By Greg Moriarty | Saturday, 15 June 2024 11:59 PM
1
Views 4.8K
Image Credit : The Washington Times

In a recent development, New York Governor Kathy Hochul has expressed her contemplation over a potential ban on face masks in the New York City subway system.

This consideration arises from concerns about individuals using masks to conceal their identities while engaging in antisemitic activities, according to ABC News.

Governor Hochul, a Democrat, has not yet clarified the specifics of this proposed policy. However, she assured that it would include "common-sense exemptions" for health, cultural, or religious reasons. This is a significant consideration, given that many individuals continue to wear masks on the subway due to concerns about COVID-19 and air pollution.

The Governor revealed that she is in discussions with lawmakers about the possibility of drafting a bill to this effect. This revelation came during a news conference in Albany, where she recounted an incident that triggered her decision. She said, "a group donning masks took over a subway car, scaring riders and chanting things about Hitler and wiping out Jews” on Monday night.

 WATCH: VIVEK SUMS UP IMMIGRATION POLICYbell_image

The exact incident Governor Hochul referred to remains unclear. It could potentially be a conflation of various episodes related to pro-Palestinian demonstrations that took place in Union Square Park on the same day. Following the rally, hundreds of people flooded into a subway station, some waving flags and banging on drums, to catch trains headed downtown.

 WATCH: TRUMP'S ECONOMIC VISIONbell_image

In a separate incident, a video circulated on social media showed a confrontation where a man in Union Square, who was not wearing a mask, was recorded shouting, “I wish Hitler was still here. He would’ve wiped all you out.” The identity of the man and his involvement in the protest remain uncertain.

 FLORIDA SCHOOL BOARD WANTS TO GRILL A 7-YEAR-OLD IN BOOK BAN BATTLEbell_image

Governor Hochul expressed her intolerance towards individuals using masks to evade responsibility for criminal or threatening behavior. She stated, “My team is working on a solution, but on a subway, people should not be able to hide behind a mask to commit crimes.”

 MARS OR BUST: ELON MUSK'S INSANE PLAN TO BUILD A MARTIAN CITY WITH HIS OWN DNA...bell_image

New York has a history of banning face masks in public, a law passed in the 1800s in response to protests over rent. This law was suspended in 2020 by then-Governor Andrew Cuomo as part of a pandemic public health campaign. Masks were also made mandatory for subway riders until September 2022.

 WATCH: HRMMM, DID PELOSI AND OBAMA JUST TURN ON BIDEN?bell_image

However, this mask ban has previously faced criticism from civil rights groups. They argue that it was selectively enforced to disrupt protests where people wanted to conceal their identities to avoid legal or professional repercussions.

Donna Lieberman, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union, expressed her concerns about the proposed ban. She stated, “A mask ban would be easily violated by bad actors and, if someone engages in unlawful actions, the judgment should be made based on the criminal behavior, not their attire.”

 IF LOOKS ARE THE KEY TO DONALD TRUMP'S VP PICK, THERE IS ONLY ONE WINNER...bell_image

Governor Hochul acknowledged the complexity of reinstating a mask ban. She stated, “We understand how complex this issue is, and we’re just listening to people and addressing their needs and taking them very seriously.”

The city has witnessed hundreds of demonstrations by pro-Palestinian activists since the war between Hamas and Israel began in October. The majority of these protests have been peaceful, with mask-wearing by participants being common, partly due to fears about police surveillance.

 KAMALA HARRIS FOR PRESIDENT? HERE'S NEWT GINGRICH'S OPINION ON THAT...bell_image

Mayor Eric Adams has also discussed the possibility of reviving some version of past mask bans. He once suggested that shopkeepers should tell people they have to remove their masks to enter.

The use of face coverings in public has declined since COVID-19 deaths abated, but many still use them. Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, stated via email, “There are people that are at high risk for severe disease from a respiratory infection who may be using masks in a crowded congregated setting such as the subway to decrease their chance of acquiring an infection."

X